Francesca Abbate

Francesca Abbate

Francesca Abbate is the author of a Troy, Unincorporated (University of Chicago Press, 2012). Her poetry has appeared in journals such as Field, Free Verse, The Iowa Review, Poetry, and Poetry Daily, and, most recently, in The Laurel Review, The Cincinnati Review, and Gulf Coast online. An associate professor of English at Beloit College, she lives in Beloit and Milwaukee.

Chris Adrian

Chris Adrian

Chris Adrian is the author of the novels Gob’s Grief, The Children’s Hospital, and The Great Night, and the story collection, A Better Angel. He is co-author of the novel, The New World, with Eli Horowitz. His work has been featured in publications such as The Paris Review, The New Yorker, Granta, Ploughshares, Best American Short Stories, and McSweeney’s. His honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, and inclusion in The New Yorker’s 2010 “20 under 40” Fiction Issue.

A graduate of the Writers’ Workshop, he earned an M.D. from Eastern Virginia Medical School, and studied theology at Harvard Divinity School. A practicing physician, he is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Columbia University Medical Center.

Ramsha Ashraf

Ramsha Ashraf

Ramsha Ashraf is a poet and playwright from Pakistan. She has a collection of poetry, Enmeshed (2015), publishes poems on her blog Escritura 415 and elsewhere, and contributes to literary magazines.

Larry Baker

Larry Baker

Bobby Beaumont is a dying man with a secret. Her name is Ellie. In alternating chapters of From a Distance, Ellie tells her story. Her private life is juxtaposed with chapters telling the public history of Bobby Beaumont. Two different worlds. Those two versions of a shared experience will force a reader to decide which is fact, which is fiction.

Larry Baker is an adjunct instructor of American History at Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids. He is the author of The Flamingo Rising (a Los Angeles Times “Top 100” book for 1997), Athens/America, A Good Man (nominated for “Book of the Year” by the Southeast Independent Booksellers Association), and Love and Other Delusions. He was included on the Iowa Literary Walk of Fame in 2010, and was twice elected to City Council in Iowa City.

Will Bardenwerper

Will Bardenwerper

Will Bardenwerper is an American writer specializing in narrative nonfiction. He is the author of The Prisoner in His Palace: Saddam Hussein, His American Guards, and What History Leaves Unsaid, which was published by Scribner in June, 2017.

Woven from first-hand accounts provided by many of the American guards, government officials, interrogators, scholars, spies, lawyers, family members, and victims, The Prisoner in His Palace shows two Saddams coexisting in one person: the defiant tyrant who uses torture and murder as tools, and a shrewd but contemplative prisoner who exhibits surprising affection, dignity, and courage in the face of looming death.

In this artfully constructed narrative, Saddam, the “man without a conscience,” gets many of those around him to examine theirs. Wonderfully thought-provoking, The Prisoner in His Palace reveals what it is like to discover in one’s ruthless enemy a man, and then deliver him to the gallows.

 

Gary Boelhower

Gary Boelhower

Gary Boelhower, author of Naming Rites: Poems, has taught ethics, leadership, and spirituality at the undergraduate and graduate levels for thirty years. He is the author of Marrow, Muscle, Flight: Poems, which won the Midwest Book Award for poetry. Boelhower is professor of theology and religious studies at the College of St. Scholastica in Duluth, MN.

Luis Bravo

Luis Bravo

Luis Bravo has published many works of poetry in book form and as multimedia, most recently Lichen (2014). Bravo, a 2012 International Writing Program participant, is a poet and performer, essayist, literary investigator, and professor. Highlights of his recent works include: Árbol Veloz, a book and CD ROM of Uruguayan poetry with the participation of 20 artists, Liquen and its multiphonic recital Tamudando together with Berta Pereira, Ale Tuana, Pollo Píriz (music), and Dana Pássaro (dance): “Acción/Huellas” (audio and text), “Croa” recorded live in theater, Lluvia, a collection organized by Mercedes Roffé; and Areñal: ene topos bilingüese & other sounds recorded with John Bennett. Bravo’s poems have been translated for anthologies and international journals in Portuguese, German, Estonian, French, Swedish, English, and Farsi.

Dan Campion

Dan Campion

Dan Campion is the author of Peter De Vries and Surrealism (Bucknell University Press) and coeditor of Walt Whitman: The Measure of His Song (Holy Cow! Press) and a contributor of poetry to many magazines, including Light, Measure, The Midwest Quarterly, The North American Review, Poetry, Rolling Stone, and Shenandoah. His poems have appeared in many anthologies, including the Holy Cow! Press books The Heart of All that Is: Reflections on Home and Amethyst and Agate: Poems of Lake Superior. He was born in Oak Park, Illinois, raised in Chicago, and educated at the University of Chicago (AB), the University of Illinois at Chicago (MA), and the University of Iowa (PhD). He has worked for Library Resources, Encyclopaedia Britannica, the Follett Publishing Company, and ACT and taught at the universities of Illinois and Iowa. He is self-employed as a writer and editor in Iowa City, Iowa.

Rafael Campo

Rafael Campo

Dr. Campo currently teaches and practices general internal medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, where his medical practice serves mostly Latinos, gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgendered people, and people with HIV infection. He is also on the faculty of the Lesley University Creative Writing MFA program.

He is the author of The Other Man Was Me (Arte Público Press, Houston, 1994), which won the 1993 National Poetry Series Award; What the Body Told (Duke University Press, Durham, 1996), which won a Lambda Literary Award for Poetry; and The Poetry of Healing: A Doctor’s Education in Empathy, Identity, and Desire (W.W. Norton, New York, 1997), a collection of essays now available in paperback under the title The Desire to Heal, which also won a Lambda Literary Award, for memoir. His poetry and prose have appeared in many major anthologies, including Best American Poetry 1995 (Scribner, New York, 1995), Things Shaped in Passing: More “Poets for Life” Writing from the AIDS Pandemic (Persea, New York, 1996), Currents in the Dancing River: Contemporary Latino Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry (Harcourt Brace, New York, 1994), and Gay Men at the Millennium (Putnam, New York, 1997); and in numerous prominent periodicals, including Boston Review, Commonweal, JAMAKenyon Review, The LancetLos Angeles TimesThe NationNew England Journal of Medicine, The New York Times MagazineThe New Republic, The Paris Review, Poetry, The Progressive, Salon.com, Slate.comThreepenny Review, Yale Review, and the Washington Post Book World. His poem “Mobidity and Mortality Rounds” was selected by Jo Shapcott as the winner of the 2013 Hippocrates Open International Prize.

His work has also been featured on the National Endowment for the Arts website and on National Public Radio. With the support of a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, he wrote Diva (Duke University Press, 1999), which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Paterson Poetry Prize, and Lambda Literary Awards for poetry. He is a recipient of the Annual Achievement Award from the National Hispanic Academy of Arts and Sciences and a Pushcart Prize, and he has served as Visiting Writer at Amherst College, artist in residence at Stanford University, George A. Miller Endowment Visiting Scholar at the University of Illinois, Champagne-Urbana and Fanny Hurst Visiting Poet at Brandeis University. He has lectured widely, with recent appearances at the Lannan Foundation, the Library of Congress, the 92nd Street Y, and other prestigious venues. He is also the recipient of an honorary Doctor of Literature degree from Amherst College. His collection of poetry, Landscape with Human Figure, was published in April 2002, and won the Gold Medal from ForeWord in poetry. In August of 2003, W.W. Norton published The Healing Art: A Doctor’s Black Bag of Poetry, essays on poetry and healing. His fifth book of poems, The Enemy, won the Sheila Motton Book Prize from the New England Poetry Club, one of the nation’s oldest poetry organizations. In November 2013 Duke University Press published his 6th book of poems entitled, Alternative Medicine.

Frances Cannon

Frances Cannon

Frances Cannon is a writer and artist of hybrid mediums. She has an MFA from the Nonfiction Writing Program at the University of Iowa, and a BFA in poetry and printmaking from the University of Vermont. She has a book of poems and illustrations, Tropicalia, through Vagabond Press, and a book of poems and prints, Uranian Fruit, through Honeybee Press. She was born in Utah and has since lived in Oregon, Vermont, California, Maine, Iowa, Italy, Guatemala, France, and Mexico making art and writing books. She has also worked as an editorial intern and contributor at McSweeney’s Quarterly, The Believer, The Lucky Peach, and The Iowa Review.

Alexander Chee

Alexander Chee

Alexander Chee has been named the sixth recipient of the Paul Engle Prize, presented by the Iowa City UNESCO City of Literature organization.

The prize, established in 2011, honors an individual who, like Paul Engle, represents a pioneering spirit in the world of literature through writing, editing, publishing, or teaching, and whose active participation in the larger issues of the day has contributed to the betterment of the world through the literary arts.

Chee will receive the prize, which includes a one-of-a-kind work of art and $10,000, during a special ceremony as part of the Iowa City Book Festival on Oct. 12. The event is at 7 p.m. at the Coralville Public Library, and is free and open to the public. The event will include remarks by Chee and a conversation between Chee and Iowa City novelist Garth Greenwell.

Speaking about the award, Chee said, “I am stunned by this news, and honored to be this year’s recipient. It’s an award I hope to live up to.”

Chee, a graduate of the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, is a Korean-American writer, poet, reviewer, and renowned essayist who writes honestly and fiercely on subjects such as race, gender, and LGBTQ+ issues. He is also a veteran of the AIDS advocacy organization, ACT UP. He lives in New York City.

His debut novel, Edinburgh, was praised for its careful handling on the difficult subject of sexual abuse. It was the winner of the Whiting Award, the James Michener/Copernicus Society Fellowship Prize, Iowa Writers’ Workshop’s Michener Copernicus Prize in Fiction, and was the recipient of the Lambda Literary Foundation Editor’s Choice Award.

His second novel, Queen of the Night, a historical novel about a female opera singer, was published in 2016, and was met with high praise. It was named it “epic” by Vogue and The Washington Post wrote that it is, “extraordinarily beautiful and dramatic, a brilliant performance.”

His essay “Girl,” which deals with gender identity, appeared in the 2016 edition of Best American Essays, and his first collection of essays, How To Write An Autobiographical Novel, is forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 2018.

The Paul Engle Prize is made possible through the generous support of the City of Coralville, which is home to 11 permanent sculptures with artistic and literary ties to Iowa. The sculptures all have ties to work found in The Iowa Writers’ Library, housed in the Coralville Marriott, which features about 800 books written by former students, graduates and faculty of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

The Engle Prize itself is a one-of-a-kind work of art created by M.C. Ginsberg in Iowa City. The piece is crafted to reflect the work and impact of the recipient, while tying it to the Iowa City UNESCO City of Literature.

 

 

Audrey Chin

Audrey Chin

Audrey Chin is a fiction and non-fiction writer from Singapore. She has a doctorate in public policy and worked in investment banking. Her story collection Nine Cuts was shortlisted for the 2016 Singapore Literature Prize.

Jennifer Colville

Jennifer Colville

Jennifer Colville is the founding editor of PromptPress, a journal for visual art. She holds an MFA from Syracuse University and a Ph.D. in English and Creative Writing from the University of Utah. She lives in Iowa City with her husband and two children.

Unsettling and perceptive, these short stories challenge American girlhood in all its delusions, conflicting messages, and treacherous terrain. Wide- and wise-eyed, mysterious girls leave their realities behind for strange and slightly unreal places at the edges of the country. Alternatively they hover over their Midwestern homes in interior worlds of their own creation. The stories in Elegies for Uncanny Girls stand at a boundary where both the girls’ bodies and their tales are either their own or laid claim to by the culture and characters that surround them. A young woman whose body continually shrinks and expands moves to Los Angeles to make a movie about tragic merpeople; bewildered and seeking guidance, a new mom strikes up a conversation with a woman with detachable hands; and spurred on by a new ally who might just be a figment of her imagination, a girl decides she can choose her own friends.

Loren W. Cooper

Loren W. Cooper

Loren W. Cooper is the author of four novels, one short story collection and one nonfiction work. His first novel was nominated for the Endeavor award. He has won the NESFA in 1998 and the EPPIE for Best Anthology in 2001. His fourth novel, CrossTown, will hit bookstores November 14th. He is married with two daughters. He currently lives in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Favorite authors include Zelazny, Hammet, Steakley, and Catton. Loren Currently works for Hewlett-Packard as a Global Systems Engineering Manager.

Eliza David

Eliza David

Eliza David is the author of the five-star rated, six-book Cougarette Series as well as her latest five-star standalone novel, BrewGirl – released in February 2016. Born and raised in Chicago, Eliza currently resides in Iowa City. When she’s not writing, working full time, or raising two children with her loving husband, she enjoys reading, fitness, and the occasional bit of celebrity gossip. Eliza is a contributing writer for the blogs Real Moms of Eastern Iowa and Thirty on Tap. She’s currently querying a romance novel featuring a diverse cast of characters.

 

Li Di An

Li Di An

Li Di An is a 2017 IWP guest writer. She is the author of the trilogy Nanyin: Memory of the City of Dragon. The creation of the Memory in the City of Dragon trilogy started from Zheng Nanyin, a character’s name that occurred to her one gloomy afternoon in 2008 when she was waiting in the corridor for class to start. She says the name conjured up in her mind the image of a cheerful teenage girl, and then the name was followed by three other names – Zheng Dongni, Zheng Xijue and Zheng Beibei. The story develops around the coming-of-age of four cousins of the Zheng family, a large family in a fictional small town in Northwest China. Published in succession, from 2009 to 2012, the trilogy has sold more than 2 million copies.

Joseph Dobrian

Joseph Dobrian

Hard Wired

Joseph Dobrian is a novelist, essayist, poet, and financial journalist, also known as a political activist and TV talk show host. Hard-Wired is his third novel. Previous books include the novels Ambitions and Willie Wilden, and the best-selling collection of essays, Seldom Right But Never In Doubt. He ran for Mayor of New York City in 2009, and now lives in Iowa City, Iowa, with four rescue cats.

Mr. Dobrian has been writing for his living for more than 30 years. He writes about real estate, finance, management, luxury retail, and other topics, for clients such as Dow Jones, J.D. Power, PricewaterhouseCoopers, American Express, American Airlines, Prudential, Ernst & Young, the Institute of Real Estate Management, and many others. He has helped several noted businesspeople to write their personal memoirs.

When he’s not writing, researching, or looking for new clients, he’s attending classical music concerts and recitals, political meetings, literary events, or Iowa Hawkeyes football games.

 

 

 

Michelle Edwards

Michelle Edwards

Michelle Edwards is the author and illustrator of many books for children, one book for adults, and nearly one hundred essays and cards for knitters. Michelle grew up in Troy, New York, and now lives in Iowa City, Iowa, where she shares, with her husband, a house full of books, yarn, and the artifacts of their three daughter’s childhoods. In her spare time,  Michelle enjoys talking about her books, writing, illustrating, and on occasion, knitting, in schools and community venues throughout the US and beyond.

Nathan Englander

Nathan Englander

A prisoner in a secret cell. The guard who has watched over him a dozen years. An American waitress in Paris. A young Palestinian man in Berlin who strikes up an odd friendship with a wealthy Canadian businessman. And The General, Israel’s most controversial leader, who lies dying in a hospital, the only man who knows of the prisoner’s existence.

 

From these vastly different lives Nathan Englander has woven a powerful, intensely suspenseful portrait of a nation riven by insoluble conflict, even as the lives of its citizens become fatefully and inextricably entwined–a political thriller of the highest order that interrogates the anguished, violent division between Israelis and Palestinians, and dramatizes the immense moral ambiguities haunting both sides. Who is right, who is wrong–who is the guard, who is truly the prisoner?
A tour de force from one of America’s most acclaimed voices in contemporary fiction.

Lori Erickson

Lori Erickson

From her childhood on an Iowa farm, Lori Erickson grew up to travel the world as a writer specializing in holy sites–journeys that led her on an ever-deepening spiritual quest. In Holy Rover, she weaves her personal narrative with descriptions of a dozen pilgrimages.

Her trips give Erickson the chance to reflect on her Lutheran upbringing, her flirtation with Wicca, and her admiration for Tibetan Buddhism. A trip to the healing shrine of Lourdes is intertwined with the story of her son’s serious illness as a baby, while visiting Thoreau’s Walden Pond blends with ruminations on being a writer.

Along the way, Erickson encounters spiritual leaders who include the chief priest of the Icelandic pagan religion of Asatru, a Trappist monk at Thomas Merton’s Gethsemani Abbey, and a Lakota retreat director at South Dakota’s Bear Butte.

Both irreverent and devout, Holy Rover includes images of holy sites around the world taken by several of the nation’s leading travel photographers.

Travel writer, Episcopal deacon, and author of the Holy Rover blog at Patheos, Erickson is an engaging guide for pilgrims eager to take a spiritual journey. Her book describes travels that changed her life and can change yours, too.

 

 

Bi Feiyu

Bi Feiyu

Bi Feiyu (毕飞宇) was raised in the Xinghua province of Jiangsu, China. After early years as a journalist in Nanjing, he went on to publish more than 20 novels and short story collections, several of which have been awarded prizes, including two Lu Xun prizes (1995-6; 2002-2005). In 2004, he was named Most Favorite Chinese Writer in France. Among his film work is the screenplay for Shanghai Triad (1995), directed by Zhang Yimou. Feiyu was an IWP resident in 2006. He is the winner of the 2015 Mao Dun Prize for Massage, and the 2010 Man Asian Literary Prize for Three Sisters. His novels have been translated and published in France and Germany.

Jin Feng

Jin Feng

Jin Feng is Professor of Chinese in the Department of Chinese and Japanese at Grinnell College. She teaches all levels of Chinese language and on Chinese literature and culture. Specific classes include “Chinese Women: Past and Present,” “Freedom and Authority: the Control of Reproduction,” and “Chinese Food for Thought.” Jin Feng is the author of Romancing the Internet: Consuming and Producing Chinese Web Romance (Leidon and Boston: Brill, 2013), The Making of a Family Saga: Ginling College (SUNY Press, 2009), Chen Hengzhe’s Early Autobiography (Anhui Education Publications, 2006), The New Woman in Early Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction (Purdue University Press, 2004), and various scholarly articles. She is currently researching and writing on Chinese culinary discourses and food nostalgia from the 6th to the 21first century.

Julia Fierro

Julia Fierro

Julia Fierro is the author of the novels The Gypsy Moth Summer and Cutting Teeth.

Her work has been published in Poets & Writers, Buzzfeed, GlamourThe Millions, Flavorwire, and other publications, and she has been profiled in Brooklyn Magazine, the L Magazine, The Observer and The Economist.

A graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, she founded The Sackett Street Writers’ Workshop in 2002, which has grown into a creative home to 4,000 writers in NYC, Los Angeles, and Online. SSWW was named “Best Writing Classes” by The Village VoiceTime Out New York, and “Best MFA-Alternative” by Poets & Writers.

Julia lives in Brooklyn and Santa Monica with writer Justin Feinstein and their two children.

Ed Folsom

Ed Folsom

Ed Folsom, Whitman Archive co-director, is the Carver Professor of English at The University of Iowa. Since 1983, he has served as Editor of the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review. He directed “Walt Whitman: The Centennial Project,” which was funded by the NEH and the Iowa Humanities Board. He is the editor of Walt Whitman: The Centennial Essays (Iowa, 1994); co-editor of Walt Whitman: The Measure of His Song (Holy Cow!, 1981, rev. ed., 1997) and Walt Whitman and the World (Iowa, 1996); and author of Walt Whitman’s Native Representations (Cambridge, 1994). He co-authored with Kenneth Price Re-Scripting Walt Whitman: An Introduction to His Life and Work (Blackwell, 2005) and co-edited Leaves of Grass: The Sesquicentennial Essays (Nebraska, 2007).

Melissa Fraterrigo

Melissa Fraterrigo

Melissa Fraterrigo is the author of the forthcoming novel Glory Days (University of Nebraska Press, fall 2017) and the short story collection The Longest Pregnancy. Her fiction and nonfiction has appeared in more than forty literary journals and anthologies from Shenandoah and The Massachusetts Review to storySouth, and Notre Dame Review. She has been a finalist for awards from Glimmer Train on multiple occasions, twice nominated for Pushcart Awards, and was the winner of the Sam Adams/Zoetrope: All Story Short Fiction Contest. She teaches classes on the art and craft of writing at the Lafayette Writers’ Studio in Lafayette, Indiana.

Alberto Fuguet

Alberto Fuguet

Alberto Fuguet is a leading member of the Latin-American literary movement McOndo, which seeks to supplant magic-realist imaginings with urban, pop-inflected globalism. In this novel, Beltrán, a Chilean seismologist, uses a list of fifty favorite films to narrate his émigré childhood in California and his return to Santiago as a ten-year-old during the turmoil of the nineteen-seventies.

Kaori Fujino

Kaori Fujino

Kaori Fujino is a fiction writer from Japan. She writes short stories and novellas about the horror that lurks behind everyday life. In 2006 she won the Bungakukai Prize for New Writers for her story “Iyashii tori” [The Greedy Bird]. Her most recent collection of stories is Final Girl (2016).

James Galvin

James Galvin

James Galvin has published eight books of poems, most recently Everything We Always Knew Was True (Copper Canyon Press, 2016). His new and collected poems, Resurrection Update (Copper Canyon Press, 1997), was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award, the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize, and the Poet’s Prize. His poetry collection, God’s Mistress, was a National Poetry Series winner.

 

James Galvin is also the author of the critically-acclaimed book of prose, The Meadow (Henry Holt, 1992), and the novel, Fencing the Sky (Henry Holt, 1999). His honors include a Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Foundation Award, a Lannan Literary Award, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Kathryn Gamble

Women and the Land takes a look at more than twenty-five women who are impacting Iowa’s farmland. Some of them have inherited rural property and are managing the agriculture practices from afar. Some are working the land directly, providing food to the heartland. Some are working in tandem with their husbands, fathers, sisters, daughters. Many of them grew up on a farm, left the land to get an education and left the state to follow their passions, only to find that their deepest passion is really the land, and have returned to it. Each of the women is affecting the land in her own unique and feminine way.

Kathryn Gamble was born on the south side of Chicago, raised in Atlanta and lived in New York City before moving to Iowa in 2005. So this farm stuff is relatively new to her. Kathryn earned her BA from the University of Georgia and also studied at the International Center of Photography in New York. Her commercial photography clients include ACLU, Meredith Corporation, Sweet Paul Magazine and Von Maur.

Enza Garcia Arreaza

Enza Garcia Arreaza

Enza Garcia Arreaza is a fiction writer and poet from Venezuela. She is an essayist for the cultural platform Backroom Caracas and for the magazine Climax. In 2016, she was selected by the Guadalajara International Book Fair for “Ochenteros,” a program for Latin American writers born in the 1980s.

Ted Genoways

Ted Genoways

Ted Genoways is an acclaimed journalist and author of This Blessed Earth: A Year in the Life of an American Family Farm. A contributing editor at Mother Jones, the New Republic, and Pacific Standard, he is the winner of a National Press Club Award and the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism, and is a two-time James Beard Foundation Award finalist. He has received fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation. A fourth-generation Nebraskan, Genoways lives outside Lincoln with his wife, Mary Anne Andrei, and their son.

For forty years, Rick Hammond has raised cattle and crops on his wife’s fifth-generation farm. But as he prepares to hand off the operation to his daughter Meghan and her husband Kyle, their entire way of life is under siege. Confronted by rising corporate ownership, encroaching pipelines, groundwater depletion, climate change, and shifting trade policies, small farmers are often caught in the middle and fighting just to preserve their way of life. Following the Hammonds from harvest to harvest, This Blessed Earth is both a history of American agriculture and a portrait of one family’s struggle to hold on to their legacy.

Crystal Spring Gibbins

Crystal Spring Gibbins

Crystal Spring Gibbins grew up on Lake of the Woods, Minnesota/Ontario. She is the editor of Split Rock Review and the recipient of fellowships from the Arrowhead Regional Arts Council and the Minnesota State Arts Board. She lives on the south shore of Lake Superior. Now/Here is her first published collection.

Erin Gitchell

Erin Gitchell

Erin Gitchell is the author of The FEAST, an epic fantasy released September 9, 2014, as well as several other novels, novellas, short stories, and nonfiction written under other names. She has a Master’s in Library and Information Science and a B.A. in Modern languages. Erin and her small family live in Iowa.

Lorna Goodison

Lorna Goodison

Poet Lorna Goodison is Jamaica’s official Poet Laureate becoming the first Jamaican woman appointed to the post. Currently one of Jamaica’s most celebrated writers, Goodison has received a Gold Musgrave Medal from the Institute of Jamaica, and a Jamaica National Order of Distinction (Commander Rank). Her collection I Am Becoming My Mother won the Commonwealth Writers Prize for the Americas region (1986) while Oracabessa earned the OCM Bocas Prize for poetry in 2014.

Goodison’s other poetry collections include Turn ThanksTravelling Mercies and Controlling the Silver. She has penned three short story collections, Baby Mother and the King of SwordsFool-Fool Rose is Leaving Labour-in-Vain Savannah, and By Love Possessed. Her memoir, From Harvey River: A Memoir of My Mother and Her Island, described as “a masterpiece of timing and texture”, received much critical praise and was awarded British Columbia’s National Award for Canadian Non-fiction in 2008. Goodison’s work has also been widely anthologized.

Garth Greenwell

Garth Greenwell

Garth Greenwell is the author of What Belongs to You, which won the British Book Award for Debut of the Year, was longlisted for the National Book Award, and was a finalist for six other awards, including the PEN/Faulkner Award, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice, it was named a Best Book of 2016 by over fifty publications in nine countries, and is being translated into eleven languages. His short fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, A Public Space, and VICE, and he has written criticism for The New Yorker, the London Review of Books, and the New York Times Book Review, among others. He lives in Iowa City.

Barbara Hall

Women and the Land takes a look at more than twenty-five women who are impacting Iowa’s farmland. Some of them have inherited rural property and are managing the agriculture practices from afar. Some are working the land directly, providing food to the heartland. Some are working in tandem with their husbands, fathers, sisters, daughters. Many of them grew up on a farm, left the land to get an education and left the state to follow their passions, only to find that their deepest passion is really the land, and have returned to it. Each of the women is affecting the land in her own unique and feminine way.

Barbara Hall, a native Iowan, has never lived on a farm but has driven past hundreds of them, blissfully unaware about who owned the land or what they were doing with it. Barbara has been writing stories since approximately age 10, and holds a journalism degree from Iowa State University. A former editor at Better Homes and Gardens magazine and other publications of Meredith Corporation, she has also worked in newspaper, advertising and public relations.

Roger Hileman

Roger Hileman

Roger Hileman divides his time between his two passions, writing and music. But with either, telling a story is the key. Roger prefers weaving tales with engrossing and inspiring landscapes. In Hammon Falls and A Killing Snow, novels coauthored with Dave Hoing, music plays a large role. Not only do singers, pianists, and fiddle players make repeated appearances, the authors weave musicality into the tale itself, employing lyrical dialogue and a well-cadenced story.

 

By day, Roger writes for a testing company’s research department, and in his spare time, he gigs around Iowa with jazz bands and other groups. He began his writing career as a playwright and screenwriter, but Dave eventually turned him to prose. Roger also enjoys history, especially the family kind, so his ancestors frequently become fodder for his fiction.

 

In his nonfiction world, Roger lives with his wife lu in Iowa City, near most of their three daughters and four grandchildren. Roger claims to have no pets, but he plays a bass trombone he named Eddie.

Justine Johnston Hemmestad

Justine Johnston Hemmestad

Truth be Told is the story of an 11th Century knight who helps a Lady realize who she truly is, how capable she is, and how much she’s needed. Justine Johnston Hemmestad’s intention was to write this story in the same vein as C.S. Lewis, heavily laden with symbolism that represents her recovery from a brain injury sustained in her 1990 car accident. As Virginia Woolf said, “The normal and comfortable state of being is that when the two [sides of the brain] live in harmony together, spiritually co-operating. If one is a man, still the woman part of his brain must have effect… Coleridge perhaps meant this when he said that a great mind is androgynous.” The format of writing about recovery in more than one person also came to the author from Aristophanes’ speech in Plato’s Symposium, as well as a theory that Emily Bronte (Wuthering Heights) may have not only modeled Catherine on herself, but Heathcliff as well.

Dung Kai-cheung

Dung Kai-cheung

Dung Kai-cheung (董啟章), a 2009 IWP resident, has published fiction including [‘Androgyny: Evolution of a Nonexistent Species’] (1996), [‘The Atlas: Archaeology of an Imaginary City’] (1997), , [‘The Rose of the Name’] (1997), [‘Visible Cities’] (1998), [‘The Catalog’] (1999), [‘A Brief History of the Silverfish’] (2002) and [‘Histories of Time’] (2007), garnering him the United Daily News Special Award for Fiction in Taiwan and the Best Artist 2007/2008 Award (literary arts) from the Hong Kong Arts Development Council. Most recently he has authored Cantonese Love Stories: Twenty-five Vignettes of a City (2017) and Atlas: The Archaeology of an Imaginary City (2012). Dung teaches creative writing and Hong Kong literature at local universities.

Hilary Kaplan

Hilary Kaplan

Hilary Kaplan is the translator of Rilke Shake by Angélica Freitas, winner of the 2016 Best Translated Book Award in poetry and shortlisted for the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation; and Ghosts, a collection of stories by Paloma Vidal. Her translations of Brazilian poetry and prose have appeared on BBC Radio 4 and in journals internationally. She received a 2011 PEN/Heim Translation Fund grant and a Rumos Literatura grant for literary criticism from Itaú Cultural. Her writing on Brazilian poetry and poetics has been published in Jacket2Rascunho, and the collection Deslocamentos Críticos (Babel, 2011).

Lisa Katz

Lisa Katz

Lisa Katz’s translations include Late Beauty: a bilingual selection of the poetry of Tuvia Ruebner, (with S. Bram) Zephyr Press (2017);  Suddenly the Sight of War: nationalism and violence in Hebrew poetry of the 1940s by Hannan Hever,Stanford (2016); Approaching You in English: a bilingual selection of the poetry of Admiel Kosman  (with S. Naim-Naor) Zephyr (2011); Look There: New and Selected Poems of Agi Mishol  Graywolf  (2006). Editor of the Israeli pages of the Poetry International Rotterdam web site for world poetry, her translations have appeared recently in Poetry, MPT, Guernica,Consequence, World Literature in Translation and the New York Times. She is the author of a chapbook, Are You With Me, Finishing Line (2016) and Reconstruction, a volume of her poetry in Hebrew translation, Am Oved (2008); also in 2008, she was awarded the Mississippi Review Poetry Prize and a Ledig House International Writers Residency.  Katz taught literary translation at Hebrew University for a decade and most recently at Ben Gurion University of the Negev in Spring 2017. Born in New York, she studied at the University of Michigan (BA English) and the City College of New York (MA Creative Writing), receiving a PhD (on the poetry of Sylvia Plath) from the English Department of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, where she has lived since 1983.

Anne Kennedy

Anne Kennedy

Anne Kennedy is a fiction writer, screenwriter and poet from New Zealand. She received the 2013 New Zealand Post Book Award for Poetry for The Darling North; in 2014 her novel The Last Days of the National Costume was a finalist for the New Zealand Post Book Award and was longlisted for the IMPAC-Dublin Award.

Jon Kerstetter

Jon Kerstetter

In Iraq, as a combat physician and officer, Jon Kerstetter balanced two impossibly conflicting imperatives–to heal and to kill. When he suffered an injury and then a stroke during his third tour, he wound up back home in Iowa, no longer able to be either a doctor or a soldier. In this gorgeous memoir that moves from his impoverished upbringing on an Oneida reservation, to his harrowing stints as a volunteer medic in Kosovo and Bosnia, through the madness of Iraq and his intense mandate to assemble a team to identify the remains of Uday and Qusay Hussein, and the struggle afterward to come to terms with a life irrevocably changed, Kerstetter beautifully illuminates war and survival, the fragility of the human body, and the strength of will that lies within.

Joe Kyugen Michaud

Joe Kyugen Michaud

Joe Kyugen Michaud was born in Maine in 1940. He served seven years with the US Army during the Cold War, which was the subject of his first book, “Along the Iron Curtain”  He has degrees in French & German from  Kansas State. He started writing in college, but didn’t hit his stride until about 1972 after he moved to Iowa.  He has been meditating daily since 1973. Meditation (TM and Zen) has had a strong influence particularly on his poetry.  Joe has self-published nine books with Camp Pope Publishing and has had “Iowa City, City of the Book” royalty published.

On the 15th of October, at 10:00 AM at the Iowa City Zen Center, Joe Kyugen Michaud will read from his latest book Prairie Wind. Nature Poems with a Zen Flavor. This will be for the first half of the reading. For the second half he will read Zen wisdom tales in verse selected from his first two books of Zen poetry. Joe’s books will be on sale, a percentage of the proceeds will go to the Zen Center.

Mike Lankford

Mike Lankford

In a book unlike anything ever written about the Renaissance genius, Mike Lankford explodes every cliché about Leonardo da Vinci and then reconstructs him based on a rich trove of available evidence — bringing to life for the modern reader the man who has been studied by scholars for centuries, yet has remained as mysterious as ever.

Seeking to envision da Vinci without the obscuring residue of historical varnish, the sights, sounds, smells, and feel of Renaissance Italy—usually missing in other biographies—are all here, transporting readers back to a world of war and plague and court intrigue, of viciously competitive famous artists, of murderous tyrants with exquisite tastes in art…

Lankford brilliantly captures da Vinci’s life as the compelling and dangerous adventure it seems to have actually been—fleeing from one sanctuary to the next, somehow surviving in war zones beside his friend Machiavelli, struggling to make art his way or no way at all… and often paying dearly for those decisions.

It is a thrilling and absorbing journey into the life of a ferociously dedicated loner, whose artwork in one way or another represents his noble rebellion, providing inspiration that is timeless.

MIKE LANKFORD is a graduate of the Iowa Writers Workshop and the author of Life in Double Time: Confessions of an American Drummer, a memoir about his years as a white drummer in a black R&B band. The book was an Amazon editor’s pick, and was selected by eight major newspapers, including the Chicago Tribune and the Austin Chronicle, as the best music book of the year.

 

Jon K. Lauck

Jon K. Lauck

Jon K. Lauck received his Ph.D. in economic history from the University of Iowa, his law degree from the University of Minnesota, and his BA from South Dakota State University. Lauck is the author of several books, including American Agriculture and the Problem of Monopoly: The Political Economy of Grain Belt Farming, 1953-1980 (University of Nebraska Press, 2000), Daschle v. Thune: Anatomy of a High Plains Senate Race (University of Oklahoma Press, 2007), Prairie Republic: The Political Culture of Dakota Territory, 1879-1889 (University of Oklahoma Press, 2010), and The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History (University of Iowa Press, 2013) and co-author and co-editor of The Plains Political Tradition: Essays on South Dakota Political Culture (South Dakota State Historical Society Press, 2011) and The Plains Political Tradition vol. 2 (South Dakota State Historical Society Press, 2014). Lauck recently edited The Midwestern Moment: The Forgotten World of Early Twentieth-Century Midwestern Regionalism, 1880-1940 (Hastings College Press, 2017). Lauck’s newest book is From Warm Center to Ragged Edge: The Erosion of Midwestern Regionalism, 1920-1965 (University of Iowa Press, 2017). Lauck has worked for several years as a full-time professor, a part-time professor, and a lawyer and is currently serving as an adjunct professor of history and political science at the University of South Dakota, as the Associate Editor and Book Review Editor of Middle West Review, as the series editor of Studies in Midwestern History, and as host of the “Heartland History” podcast. He is the immediate past-president of the Midwestern History Association.

Luljeta Lleshanaku

Luljeta Lleshanaku

Luljeta Lleshanaku was born in Elbasan, Albania in 1968. Llleshanaku won the National Silver Pen Prize in 2000 and the International Kristal Vilenica Prize in 2009. She was a resident at the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa in 1999, and a fellow at the Black Mountain Institute at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 2008. Her collection Child of Nature was a finalist for the 2011 Best Translated Book Award. Her forthcoming book is Negative Space (2018).

Okky Madasari

Okky Madasari

Okky Madasari is a novelist from Indonesia. She is is the founder and director of the ASEAN Literary Festival. In 2012, her novel The Outcast, about an Islamic sect facing persecution by mainstream religion, received the Khatulistiwa Literary Award.

Christopher Merrill

Christopher Merrill

Christopher Merrill has published six collections of poetry, including Brilliant Water, and Watch Fire, for which he received the Lavan Younger Poets Award from the Academy of American Poets; translations of Aleš Debeljak’s Anxious Moments and The City and the Child; several edited volumes, among them, The Forgotten Language: Contemporary Poets and Nature and From the Faraway Nearby: Georgia O’Keeffe as Icon; and five books of nonfiction, The Grass of Another Country: A Journey Through the World of SoccerThe Old Bridge: The Third Balkan War and the Age of the RefugeeOnly the Nails Remain: Scenes from the Balkan WarsThings of the Hidden God: Journey to the Holy Mountain, and The Tree of the Doves: Ceremony, Expedition, War. his most recent work, Self-Portrait with Dogwood, was released in February, 2017

His work has been translated into twenty-five languages, his journalism appears in many publications, and his awards include a knighthood in arts and letters from the French government. He has held the William H. Jenks Chair in Contemporary Letters at the College of the Holy Cross, and now directs the International Writing Program at The University of Iowa. He serves on the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO, he has conducted cultural diplomacy missions in over thirty countries for the U.S. State Department, and in April 2012 President Obama appointed Merrill to the National Council on the Humanities.

Sadek Mohammed

Sadek Mohammed

Sadek Mohammed is the author of the collection of poetry Archaeology of Scorched Cities (2013), the co-editor of Flowers of Flame: Unheard Voices of Iraq (2008) which was awarded the IPPY/Independent Publisher Book Award (2009) in the USA, and Ishtar’s Songs: Iraqi Poetry since the 1970s (2011). He has translated Maya Angelou, W. B. Yeats, Arthur Rimbaud, Sergey Yesinin, Osip Mandelstam, Elena Urlova and Mochamed Achmedov  into Arabic and more than seventy Iraqi poets into English. His work has been published in GilgameshAtlanta ReviewGrantathe Normal School and BANR Best American Nonrequired Reading among various other publications.  A lecturer and Professor at a number of universities and institutions since 1992, Mohammed currently is the director of Baghdad city of Literature and a professor of modern poetry in the University of Mustansiriya in Baghdad.

Peter Nazareth

Peter Nazareth

Peter Nazareth is Professor of English and Advisor to the International Writing Program. He teaches and has written about African, Caribbean, African-American, Goan, and other literatures, as well as Elvis as Anthology, for which he has received a great deal of media attention. His publications include In the Trickster Tradition: The Novels of Andrew Salkey, Francis Ebejer, and Ishmael Reed (1994); Edwin Thumboo: Creating a Nation Through Poetry (2008); and the long essay “Elvis as Anthology” in Vernon Chadwick, ed., In Search of Elvis: Music, Race, Art, Religion. He edited Critical Essays on Ngugi wa Thiong’o (2000) and Pivoting on the Point of Return: Modern Goan Literature(2010). His first novel, In a Brown Mantle, is now being taught at the University of Pretoria and by Ngugi wa Thiong’o at U.C. Irvine.

Jade Novarino

Jade Novarino

Jade Novarino is an interdisciplinary artist, practicing calligrapher, and mail-artist who makes paintings, video works, books, and objects. Her work lives between contexts, somewhere within the art world and the quotidian/everyday. Jade runs and facilitates Conduit, a project space and artist residency in Portland, Oregon. www.ccoonndduuiitt.art.

2:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 14 at the Iowa City Public Library, Meeting room D, 123 S. Linn St., Iowa City, IA 52240

Pola Oloixarac

Pola Oloixarac

Pola Oloixarac is a fiction writer and essayist. Her novels, Savage Theories and Dark Constellations, have been translated into seven languages. Her writing has appeared in n+1The White ReviewThe New York Times, and Granta, which named her to its list of Best Young Spanish Novelists. She wrote the libretto for the opera Hercules in Mato Grosso, which debuted at Buenos Aires’s Teatro Colón and was staged at New York City’s Dixon Place. She lives in San Francisco, where she’s completing a PhD at Stanford University. Savage Theories is her first novel to appear in English.

Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor

Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor

Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor is a Kenyan writer, who was named “Woman of the Year” by Eve Magazine in Kenya in 2004 for her contribution to the country’s literature and arts. She won the 2003 Caine Prize for African Writing for her story “Weight of Whispers”, which considers an aristocratic Rwandan refugee in Kenya. The story was originally published in Kwani?, the Kenyan literary magazine set up by Binyavanga Wainaina after he won the Caine Prize the previous year. Her most recent book Dust won the Jomo Kenyatta Prize for Literature.

Tim Parks

Tim Parks

Tim Parks is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, the latest being Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis.

Steve Paul

Steve Paul

Steve Paul has been a writer and editor based in Kansas City for more than four decades. His long newspaper career ran a gamut from local news and politics, to long-form features on culture, crime and food, to extended stints as book review editor, architecture writer, and editorial page editor. He retired in 2016 in order to focus on books, other writing projects, photography and more. He’s the editor of Kansas City Noir, an anthology of contemporary short fiction (Akashic Books); co-editor of War + Ink: New Perspectives on Ernest Hemingway’s Early Life and Writings(Kent State University Press); and in October 2017 his book Hemingway at Eighteen: The Pivotal Year That Launched an American Legend will be published by Chicago Review Press.

Jim Perlman

Jim Perlman

After editing several little magazines, Holy Cow! Press was founded in Spring, 1977 by editor/publisher Jim Perlman in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In the ensuing 40 years, he has published over 125 titles and moved the press operations to Iowa City, Iowa and Stevens Point, Wisconsin, before returning to Minnesota (Duluth) in 1988. At the University of Iowa, Perlman earned a MA, Ed.S. in English. As a graduate student, he worked at the University of Iowa Press, and was a student editor at The Iowa Review, the Iowa Journal of Literary Studies and, for its first three years, was the graduate student assistant of The Walt Whitman Quarterly Review. He has co-edited and published several literary anthologies including Walt Whitman: The Measure of His Song (1981, rev ed. 1998) with Ed Folsom and Dan Campion. He and his wife Deborah are the proud parents of four adult children and Arthur Everett Graham, a grandson.

Poon Yiu Ming

Poon Yiu Ming is an essayist and publisher in Hong Kong. He was a 1983 IWP resident and is currently the Chief Editor of Ming Pao Monthly.

D.A. Powell

D.A. Powell

D. A. Powell is the author of five original poetry collections, including the trilogy of Tea (Wesleyan University Press, 1998), Lunch (Wesleyan University Press, 2000), and Cocktails (Graywolf Press, 2004), which was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His poetry collection, Chronic (Graywolf Press, 2009), received the Kingsley Tufts Award, and was nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award. His most recent books are Repast: Tea, Lunch, Cocktails (Graywolf Press, 2014) and Useless Landscape, or a Guide for Boys: Poems (Graywolf Press, 2012), which was the winner of the 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry.

 

A graduate of the Writers’ Workshop, his honors include a Paul Engle Fellowship from the James Michener Center, a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Lyric Poetry Award from the Poetry Society of America. He has taught at Columbia University, the University of Iowa, Sonoma State University, San Francisco State University, and served as the Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Poetry at Harvard University. He currently teaches at the University of San Francisco.

Sarah Prineas

Sarah Prineas

Sarah Prineas lives in the midst of the corn in rural Iowa, where she wrangles dogs, cats, chickens, and goats, goes on lots of hikes, and finds time to write. She is also the author of Ash & Bramble, a retelling of Cinderella. She is married to a physics professor and has two kids.

Jennifer Pritchard

Jennifer Pritchard

Jennifer Pritchard is a mom, a bhakti yogi, visual artist, sanskrit kirtan songstress and poet. She currently hails from coastal Canada, yet she has spent significant stretches of time surrounded by wheat, corn and cows in the prairie lands of Saskatchewan and Iowa.

Donald Ray Pollock

Donald Ray Pollock

Donald Ray Pollock is an American writer. Born in 1954 and raised in Knockemstiff, Ohio, Pollock has lived his entire adult life in Chillicothe, Ohio, where he worked at the Mead Paper Mill as a laborer and truck driver until age 50, when he enrolled in the English program at Ohio State University. While there, Doubleday published his debut short story collection, Knockemstiff, and the New York Times regularly posted his election dispatches from southern Ohio throughout the 2008 campaign. The Devil All the Time, his first novel, was published in 2011. His work has appeared in various literary journals, including Epoch, Sou’wester, Granta, Third Coast, River Styx, The Journal, Boulevard, Tin House, and PEN America. His newest book is a novel called The Heavenly Table.

Julie Russell-Steuart

Julie Russell-Steuart

PLuto FlybyVisual artist Julie Russell-Steuart grew up in Maryland and earned a BFA in General Fine Art from Maryland Institute, College of Art. She publishes letterpress books of poetry, artist’s books, prints, and stationery on a vintage Vandercook printing press under the imprint Caveworks Press.  A Chandler & Price platen press, guillotine paper cutter and nine type cabinets full of metal typefaces and various antique cuts round out her print shop. Her artwork combines printmaking techniques like linoleum carving, pressure printing, collagraph, and wood engraving. She uses various book-binding techniques to make blank journals. Her artist’s books are collected privately and by several University libraries, including The University of Iowa, Texas State University and the Lucille Little Fine Arts Library at the University of Kentucky. She resides in Reinbeck, Iowa, with her husband David, and daughter Cassandra.

Jeffrey Ryan

Jeffrey Ryan

Author, speaker, photographer and avid hiker Jeff Ryan was born and raised in Maine. His love of the outdoors was evident early in life (his first memory is sitting under a backyard maple tree at the age of two and being fascinated by the movement of the summer leaves above).

Three decades and 2,100 miles in the making, Appalachian Odyssey: A 28 Year Hike on America’s Trail is a travelogue rich in history, visual beauty and storytelling that appeals to the adventurer inside each of us.

When two friends went for a one-day hike in Maine in 1985, they had no idea they were actually starting a 2,100 mile, 28-year adventure. Inspired by the author’s trail journals, Appalachian Odyssey is not a “how to” guide, but an enduring story told through a refreshing blend of history, photography and wit. This Appalachian Trail book is an uplifting reminder that the most meaningful accomplishments in life rarely happen overnight, but are achieved by making steady progress toward our goals.

Steve Semken

Steve Semken

Steve Semken founded the Ice Cube Press in 1993 as a way to use the literary arts to better learn how to best live in the Midwest. Since then he has published the work of hundreds of authors of both regional and national acclaim. He speaks and teaches throughout the Midwest on issues of creativity, entrepreneurship, writing, and publishing. His debut novel Pick Up Stick City: Restoration Fiction was published by Rivers Bend Press in Minnesota and reviewed by Publishers Weekly. A second book, The Great Blues, was awarded with the Kansas Book Award. Soul External: Rediscovering the Great Blues was published in 2014.

Yuriy Serebriansky

Yuriy Serebriansky

Yuriy Serebriansky is a fiction writer and journalist from Kazakhstan. He is is the editor-in-chief of Esquire Kazakhstan, the editor of the Polish diaspora magazine Ałmatyński Kurier Polonijny, and the author of five volumes of prose and poetry.

Yaara Shehori

Yaara Shehori

Yaara Shehori is a fiction writer, poet and editor from Israel. She is a literary editor at Keter Publishing House with a doctorate in Hebrew literature. She has published many works of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction—most recently the novel [Aquarium] (2016).

Daniel Simon

Daniel Simon

Daniel Simon is a publisher, poet and translator. He is the editor in chief of World Literature Today. His newest book of poems, After Reading Everything, was just released by Eyewear Publishing.

Whitney Terrell

Whitney Terrell

Whitney Terrell’s novel, The Good Lieutenant (FSG), was selected as a best book of 2016 by The Washington PostThe Boston Globe, and Refinery 29. It was long-listed for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. He is also the author of The Huntsman (Viking), a New York Times notable book in 2001, and The King of Kings County (Viking), which was selected as a best book of 2005 by the Christian Science Monitor. He is currently an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, where he teaches Creative Writing. He has also taught fiction at Princeton University and was the Hodder Fellow for 2008-2009.

His nonfiction has appeared in The New York Times, Harper’s Magazine, The New Republic, Literary Hub, and other publications. He was an embedded reporter in Iraq during 2006 and 2010 and covered the war for The Washington Post Magazine, Slate and NPR. He was born and raised in Kansas City.

John Ira Thomas

John Ira Thomas

John Ira Thomas is the author of over twenty books, including the award-winning graphic novel MAN IS VOX: Barracudae (2015 Indiefab Silver Medal in Graphic Novels) from Candle Light Press. He has two Master’s Degrees, stoops a bit, and his newest book is MAN IS VOX: Paingels (Expanded Edition), the original edition of which Booklist said “recalls nothing more than the early surrealist film masterpieces Dalí and Buñuel’s Un chien Andalou and Cocteau’s Le Sang d’un poete.”

Jeremy Tiang

Jeremy Tiang

Jeremy Tiang is the author of State of Emergency (2017, finalist for the 2016 Epigram Books Fiction Prize) and It Never Rains on National Day (2015, shortlisted for the 2016 Singapore Literature Prize). He won the Golden Point Award for Fiction in 2009 for his story “Trondheim”. He also writes and translates plays, including A Dream of Red PavilionsThe Last Days of LimehouseA Son Soon by Xu Nuo, and Floating Bones by Quah Sy Ren and Han Lao Da. Tiang has translated more than ten books from the Chinese—including novels by Chan Ho-Kei, Zhang Yueran, Yeng Pway Ngon and Su Wei-chen—and has received an NEA Literary Translation Fellowship, a PEN/Heim Translation Grant, and a People’s Literature Award Mao-Tai Cup.

Antoinette Tidjani Alou

Antoinette Tidjani Alou

Antoinette Tidjani Alou is a fiction writer, poet, translator and scholar from Niger. She teaches literature and directs the Program of Performing Arts at Abdou Moumouni University in Niamey.

Zachary Turpin

Zachary Turpin

No one laid eyes on it until 2016 when literary scholar Zachary Turpin followed a paper trail deep into the Library of Congress, where the sole surviving copy of Jack Engle has lain waiting for generations. Now, after more than 160 years, the University of Iowa Press is honored to reprint this lost work, restoring a missing piece of American literature by one of the world’s greatest authors, written as he verged on immortality.

Anja Utler

Anja Utler

Anja Utler was a 2014 IWP resident. Her poetry collection münden – entzüngeln won the coveted “Leonce-und-Lena-Preis” for Poetry in 2003. For her innovative poetic exploration of political issues such as ecology in her latest book ausgeübt. Eine Kurskorrektur, she was awarded with the “Basler Lyrikpreis” (Basel Poetry Prize) in 2014. In spring 2015, she was German Writer in Residence at Oberlin College, Ohio. Utler’s works explore the impact of different media and modes of perception on the experience of a text: her works brinnen (2006) and jana, vermacht (2009) were both published in print and audio formats; jana, vermacht was also transformed into an installation for an exhibition. Utler’s works have been translated into more than 20 languages.

Inara Verzemnieks

Inara Verzemnieks

“It’s long been assumed of the region where my grandmother was born…that at some point each year the dead will come home,” Inara Verzemnieks writes in this exquisite story of war, exile, and reconnection. Her grandmother’s stories recalled one true home: the family farm left behind in Latvia, where, during WWII, her grandmother Livija and her grandmother’s sister, Ausma, were separated. They would not see each other again for more than 50 years. Raised by her grandparents in Washington State, Inara grew up among expatriates, scattering smuggled Latvian sand over the coffins of the dead, singing folk songs about a land she had never visited.

When Inara discovers the scarf Livija wore when she left home, in a box of her grandmother’s belongings, this tangible remnant of the past points the way back to the remote village where her family broke apart. There it is said the suspend their exile once a year for a pilgrimage through forests and fields to the homes they left behind. Coming to know Ausma and the trauma of her exile to Siberia under Stalin, Inara pieces together Livija’s survival through years as a refugee. Weaving these two parts of the family story together in spellbinding, lyrical prose, she gives us a profound and cathartic account of loss, survival, resilience, and love.

Inara Verzemnieks teaches creative nonfiction at the University of Iowa. She has won a Pushcart Prize and a Rona Jaffe Writer’s Award, and has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in feature writing. She lives in Iowa City, Iowa.

Manuel Vilas

Manuel Vilas

Manuel Vilas, winner of the 2015 Letters of Aragon Award-, and X Llanes of Travelers Award, writes novels, short stories, poetry and non-fiction; in addition he writes regularly for newspapers such El Pais, Grupo Bocento and in literary journals. Recent books include the non-fiction books América (2017) and Arde el sol sin tiempo (2014), the novels Lou Reed era español (2016), El luminoso regalo (2013), Los inmortales(2012), and the short stories Setecientos millones de rinocerontes (2015). Published and much acclaimed books of poetry include Resurrección (XV Jaime Gil de Biedma Award, 2005), Calor (VI Fray Luis of León Award, 2008), Amor. poesía reunida, 1988 -2010 Amor. poesía reunida (2010), Gran Vilas (XXXIII City of Melilla Award, 2012), and El hundimiento (Generación of 27 Award, 2015.) Visor Publishers published his Complete Poetry from 1980 to 2016, a volume of 640 pages, in 2016. During the Spring 2017 he was an Obermann Fellow Writer in Residence at the University of Iowa. His books had been translated to English, French, Turkish and Bulgarian.

Xavier Villanova

Xavier Villanova

Xavier Villanova is a playwright, screenwriter, stage director, actor and translator from  Mexico. He has had his work staged in Mexico, the U.S., and Venezuela; in 2011, the Lark Play Development Center in New York workshopped his Acheron: The River of Tragedy. Ocean Blues, co-written by him and based on his eponymous play, is on Netflix.

Jacquelyn Vincenta

Jacquelyn Vincenta

Jacquelyn Vincenta has been writing since she was a child. Vincenta graduated from the University of Iowa with a degree in English Literature with Honors in Creative Writing, and has made language the center of her career ever since then. Vincenta’s first paid writing job was as a police beat reporter for the Slidell (Louisiana) Daily News, and her current non-fiction job is as blog writer and copywriter for the Prague-based translation company Skrivanek (you can find my articles related to languages and translation at Skrivanek.com). Vincenta’s deepest passion is the natural world, so the presence of her world — Michigan and its waters — has a powerful influence on the stories she immerse herself in. Vincenta writes fiction from her home in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and other borrowed desks when she is on the road.

Daniel Wallace

Daniel Wallace

Daniel Wallace is a comic book expert, sci-fi sage, and lifelong geek. Author or co-author of more than two dozen books including The Jedi Path, Ghostbusters: The Ultimate Visual History, Iron Man Manual, Man of Steel: Inside the Legendary World of Superman, and the New York Times bestselling Star Wars: The New Essential Guide to Characters, his specialty is exploring the underpinnings of popular fictional universes.

wellRED: From Dixie With Love

wellRED: From Dixie With Love

Trae Crowder (The Liberal Redneck), Drew Morgan and Corey Ryan Forrester are stand-up comedy and writing partners. The trio has been touring nationally to sold out clubs and theatres in support of their best-selling book, Liberal Redneck Manifesto: Draggin Dixie Outta the Dark.

This year’s tour, wellRED: From Dixie With Love, is about celebrating everything great about the South and telling stories from a place of love. It’s about dancing to country music at a gay wedding. It’s about loving your neighbor whether you have the same religion, skin color, or sexual preference, as long as they cheer for the same college football team (Go Vols!).  It is about leaving behind bigotry, but remembering the fried okra.

Tickets at www.Englert.org.

Kenneth Whyte

Kenneth Whyte

Elizabeth Willis

Elizabeth Willis

Elizabeth Willis’s most recent book is Alive: New and Selected Poems (New York Review Books, 2015), which was a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry. Her other books of poetry include Address (Wesleyan University Press, 2011), recipient of the PEN New England/L. L. Winship Prize for Poetry; Meteoric Flowers (Wesleyan University Press, 2006); Turneresque (Burning Deck, 2003); The Human Abstract (Penguin, 1995); and Second Law (Avenue B, 1993). She also writes about contemporary poetry and has edited a volume of essays entitled Radical Vernacular: Lorine Niedecker and the Poetics of Place (University of Iowa Press, 2008).

 

A recent Guggenheim fellow, she has held residencies at Brown University, the MacDowell Colony, the Ucross Foundation, and the Centre International de Poésie, Marseille. Her poetry has been translated into French, Dutch, Polish, and Slovak.

Andrea Wilson

Andrea Wilson

Iowa Writers HouseA visual artist, writer, and storyteller, Andrea Wilson believes that creativity and expression define the beauty of the human experience.  In early 2014, she moved back to the UNESCO City of Literature to passionately pursue writing, only to feel disconnected from the very literary community that brought her home. The Iowa Writers’ House started as an altruistic dream to create a springboard for all of those involved in using art and literature to connect with themselves the world. Today the organization reaches over 3000 writers, offers workshops and programs in both Iowa City and Des Moines, and has created strategic relationships connecting Iowa with festivals in Puerto Rico, Cuba, and other Cities of Literature across the globe. 

G. Willow Wilson

G. Willow Wilson

G. Willow Wilson is a superhero who employs her literary powers to address pressing issues including religious intolerance and gender politics. In fiction, nonfiction, and comics, the American convert to Islam has distinguished herself as a writer of remarkable originality and insight. In her lecture, Wilson uses the challenges Ms. Marvel—a Pakistani-American Muslim teenager—faces as a parallel for the challenges of a misunderstood generation: the millennials. She’ll discuss the genesis of Ms. Marvel, her roots in the historical science fiction/fantasy tradition, and the significance of writing a superhero for a millennial (and wider) audience.

Wilson’s memoir, The Butterfly Mosque, which recounts her life in Egypt during the waning day of the Mubarak regime, is the 2017 selection for the One Community, One Book program sponsored by the University of Iowa Center for Human Rights.

Ya Hsien

Ya Hsien

Ya Hsien is the penname of Wang Ching-Lin (Wang Qinglin). Born in Nanyang County, Henan Province, he was active in Taiwan’s Modernist Movement in the 1950s and 1960s. He is best known for a single collection of poetry titled Abyss, published in 1968, and an expanded edition in 1971. He stopped writing poetry altogether in the mid-1960s. In 1968 he attended the Writer’s Workshop at the University of Iowa, and later attended the University of Wisconsin, Madison, from which he received an MA in East Asian Studies. After retiring in 1971 with the rank of Lieutenant Commander, he taught and edited at a series of magazines, eventually editing the influential literary supplement of the United Daily News. He now calls Vancouver home but spends a good deal of time in Taiwan and China.