Haifa Abu Al-Nadi 

Haifa Abu Al-Nadi 

Haifa Abu Al-Nadi of Jordan is a poet, fiction writer, screenwriter, translator, and professor of English. Author of two cross-genre collections, she researches social issues, music, film, international literature, and her poetry appears frequently in Jordanian periodicals. She participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. State Department.

Usman Ali

Usman Ali

Usman Ali of Pakistan is a playwright instrumental in Pakistan’s theater scene, founding the only theater in the city of Mandi Bahauddin. His plays have been widely studied throughout Pakistan, and three will be staged at the The Royal Court Theatre in England. He participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Eman Alyousuf  م. إيمان اليوسف

Eman Alyousuf م. إيمان اليوسف

Eman Alyousuf  م. إيمان اليوسف  of the United Arab Emirates is a chemical engineer, journalist, and fiction writer who has stated that her role as a writer is to provoke readers to ask questions. Her feminist short film Ghafa (screened at the 2017 Dubai International Film Festival) received criticism for addressing controversial topics. She participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State.

Anastacia-Reneé

Anastacia-Reneé

Anastacia-Reneé is the current Seattle Civic Poet and former 2015-2017 Hugo House Poet-in-Residence. She is a hybrid genre writer, workshop facilitator, and multivalent artist. In addition to (v.), she is the author of Forget It (Black Radish Press), Answer (Me) (Argus Press), and 26 (Dancing Girl Press). Her poetry, prose, and fiction have been published widely.

James Anderson

James Anderson

James Anderson was born in Seattle and raised in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. He is a graduate of Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and received his Master’s Degree in Creative Writing from Pine Manor College in Boston. For many years he worked in book publishing. Other jobs have included logging, commercial fishing and, briefly, truck driver. He currently divides his time between Ashland, Oregon, and the Four Corners region of the American Southwest. Lullaby Road was released in January 2018.

James A. Autry

James A. Autry

James A. Autry is a former Fortune 500 executive, who is also an author, poet and business coach. He lives in Des Moines. He is the author of 15 books, including The Cold Warrior: When Flying was Dangerous and Sex Was Safe. He also is the author of Everyday Virtues: Classic Tales to Read with Kids, written with his son, Rick. Other of his books address servant leadership, gratitude, and business poetry.

Kateryna Babkina Катерина Бабкіна

Kateryna Babkina Катерина Бабкіна

Kateryna Babkina Катерина Бабкіна of Ukraine is a fiction writer, poet, and playwright often called the voice of her generation, and published her first book at age 17. Her children’s book Шапочка і кит [Cappy and the Whale], a commercial success, raised funds for pediatric cancer. She participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the Paul and Hualing Engle Fund.

Bayasgalan Batsuuri Баясгалан Батсуурийн

Bayasgalan Batsuuri Баясгалан Батсуурийн

Bayasgalan Batsuuri Баясгалан Батсуурийн of Mongolia is a poet, translator, and founder of the publishing house Tagtaa, which aims to broaden gender representation in literature to combat systematic sexism. She participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State.

Ari Berman

Ari Berman

Ari Berman is a senior reporter for Mother Jones and a Fellow at The Nation Institute. His book, Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America, was published in August 2015 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. He has written extensively about American politics, civil rights, and the intersection of money and politics. His stories have also appeared in The New York Times, Rolling Stone, and The Guardian, and he is a frequent guest and commentator on MSNBC and NPR. His first book, Herding Donkeys: The Fight to Rebuild the Democratic Party and Reshape American Politics, was published in 2010 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Denise Pattiz Bogard

Denise Pattiz Bogard

Denise Pattiz Bogard, author of the forthcoming AFTER ELISE (Ardent Writer Press, August 2018)   and THE MIDDLE STEP (High Hill Press, fall 2015), has been writing professionally for more than 40 years. Her award-winning fiction and non-fiction have been published in, among others, The Oklahoma Literary Review, Newsweek, Lady’s Circle, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and Teacher Magazine, and two of her essays have been anthologized. Over the years she has been a journalist, a co-founding public relations partner, a certified secondary English/writing teacher, the founder of St. Louis Writers Workshop, and a novelist. Denise lives in St. Louis with her husband.

AFTER ELISE has been named a finalist in the Faulkner-Wisdom Creative Writing Contest, novel category.

 

Rumena Bužarovska

Rumena Bužarovska

Rumena Bužarovska of Macedonia spearheaded Macedonia’s #metoo movement (#Segakazuvam, which translates to “I’m Telling Now”). Named in 2016 as one of Ten New Voices from Europe to Watch, she is an award-winning teacher, writer, and activist for marginalized populations in her country. She participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State.

Ira Byock

Ira Byock

Dr. Ira Byock, Fellow of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, is a leading palliative care physician, author, and public advocate for improving care through the end of life. Byock’s first book, Dying Well, (1997) has become a standard in the field of hospice and palliative care. The Four Things That Matter Most, (2004) is used as a counseling tool widely by palliative care and hospice programs, as well as within pastoral care. His most recent book, The Best Care Possible (March 2012) tackles the crisis that surrounds serious illness and dying in America and his quest to transform care through the end of life. It has been praised by the Wall Street Journal, the Economist and other major publications, and won the Annual Books for a Better Life Award in the category of Wellness.

Tameka Cage Conley

Tameka Cage Conley

Tameka Cage Conley, PhD, is a literary artist who writes fiction, poetry, plays, essays, and librettos. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where she was a recipient of the Truman Capote Fellowship and a Graduate Fellowship. Her work has appeared in PloughsharesCallalooAfrican American Review, and is forthcoming in the Virginia Quarterly Review. She has received scholarships and fellowships from the Cave Canem Foundation, the Vermont Studio Center, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and the Squaw Valley Community of Writers. Her libretto, RISE, premiered at the AME Metropolitan Church in Washington, D.C., in 2015, and she  read parts of the libretto dedicated to Congressman John Lewis, to the congressman in his office on Capitol Hill later that year. She currently holds the Provost Postgraduate Visiting Writer Fellowship in Fiction and is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Iowa, where she teaches courses in advanced fiction writing. She is at work on her first novel which chronicles the untimely, racist deaths of African-American men in Shreveport, Louisiana over six decades. 

Chow Hon-Fai (Bohemia) 周漢輝

Chow Hon-Fai (Bohemia) 周漢輝

Chow Hon-Fai (Bohemia) 周漢輝 of Hong Kong writes prose and poetry under the pen name Bohemia, and his award-winning writing examines the absurd effects of poverty and grief. Bohemia uses techniques traditional to filmmaking to incorporate movement, light, and sound in his writing. The recipient of many awards, he participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation.

Max Allan Collins

Max Allan Collins

Max Allan Collins is a frequent Mystery Writers of America “Edgar” nominee in both fiction and non-fiction categories, he has earned an unprecedented 18 Private Eye Writers of America “Shamus” nominations, winning for his Nathan Heller novels, True Detective and Stolen Away. His graphic novel Road to Perdition (1998) is the basis of the Academy Award-winning 2002 film. His many comics credits include the syndicated strip Dick Tracy (1977 – 1993), and his own Ms. Tree (longest-running private eye comic book). His new book is Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago.

 

Dan Coman

Dan Coman

Dan Coman of Romania has published four books of poems and three novels. His writing has received many awards including the Crystal Vilenica Prize, and Radio Romania’s Cultural Award – twice – and his work has been anthologized and translated into seven languages. His participation in the IWP Fall Residency is made possible by the U.S. Embassy Bucharest.

Common

Common

Common has earned a reputation in the hip-hop world as a conscious artist by embracing themes of love and struggle in his songs. His journey toward understanding is rooted in his relationship with a remarkable woman, his mother.

Common holds nothing back in this gripping memoir, both provocative and funny. He tells what it was like for a boy with big dreams growing up on the South Side of Chicago. He reveals how he almost quit rapping after his first album sold only two thousand copies. He recounts his rise to stardom and talks about the challenges of balancing fame, love, and family. Through it all, Common emerges as a man in full. Rapper. Actor. Activist. But also father, son, and friend. His story offers a living example of how, no matter what you’ve gone through, one day it’ll all make sense.

Art Cullen

Art Cullen

When The Storm Lake Times, a tiny Iowa twice-weekly, won a Pulitzer Prize for taking on big corporate agri-industry for poisoning the local rivers and lake, it was a coup on many counts: a strike for the well being of a rural community; a triumph for that endangered species, a family-run rural news weekly; and a salute to the special talents of a fierce and formidable native son, Art Cullen.

In this candid and timely book, Cullen describes how the rural prairies have changed dramatically over his career, as seen from the vantage point of a farming and meatpacking town of 15,000 in Northwest Iowa. Politics, agriculture, the environment, and immigration are all themes in Storm Lake, a chronicle of a resilient newspaper, as much a survivor as its town.

Kathy Eldon

Kathy Eldon

Born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and a graduate of Wellesley College, Kathy Eldon has worked as a teacher, journalist, author and film and television producer in England, Africa and the United States. In 1998 Kathy launched Creative Visions Foundation, inspired by the life of Kathy’s son, Dan Eldon – artist, creative activist and photojournalist killed at the age of 22 in 1993, while on assignment for Reuters in Somalia. Since 2004, the organization has acted as an incubator, accelerator and agency for more than 360 projects and productions by artists, filmmakers, playwrights and leaders of social movements who use media and the arts to ignite positive social change. Creative Visions, which has impacted more than 100 million people, has been recognized as a United Nations Non-Governmental Organization (NGO.) BROUGHT TO YOU BY “THE GREEN ROOM” – Inviting the city to school!

Jane Gregory

Jane Gregory

Jane Gregory’s mystifying second collection, YEAH NO, begins with a “Knock knock,” inviting the reader into a realmwhere “Everything is a pattern / of yesses and no.” Within these pages we find Gregory constructing a multivalent world–ripe with struggle, prophecy, and, by the end, a resemblance of hope. Using her highly-tuned sensibility throughout, Gregory guides us through the anxieties of this journey by inventing new and enigmatic forms filled with sonic experimentation and polyphony. YEAH NO builds upon the singular vision found within her previous collection, MY ENEMIES, and continues her elegant and challenging address to poetry. Jane Gregory is from Tucson and lives in Oakland. YEAH NO (The Song Cave, 2018) is her second book. Her first, MY ENEMIES, was published by The Song Cave in 2013. She is co-founder and co-editor of Nion Editions, a chapbook press.

Eduardo Halfon

Eduardo Halfon

Eduardo Halfon was born in Guatemala City, moved to the United States at the age of 10, went to school in South Florida, studied industrial engineering at North Carolina State University, and then returned to Guatemala to teach literature for eight years at Universidad Francisco Marroquín. He is the author of 14 books published in Spanish and three novels published in English: Mourning; Monastery, longlisted for the Best Translated Book Award; and The Polish Boxer, a New York Times Editors’ Choice selection. Halfon currently lives in Nebraska and frequently travels to Guatemala. He is a visiting instructor  at the University of Iowa’s Spanish Creative Writing MFA program.

 

Tehila Hakimi תהילה חכימי

Tehila Hakimi תהילה חכימי

Tehila Hakimi תהילה חכימי of Israel is a poet, fiction writer, mechanical engineer, and graphic novelist, winning the Bernstein Prize for Literature, the Yehoshua Rabinowitz Foundation Prize for Literature, and the Israeli Ministry of Culture Prize for Emerging Poets. She participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise.

Rick Harsch

Rick Harsch

Rick Harsch appeared on the American literary scene in 1997 with the cult classic The Driftless Zone, followed by Billy Verite and Sleep of the Aborigines (all Steerforth Press) to form The Driftless Trilogy. Born and bred in the Midwest, Harsch received degrees in sociology and history from UW La Crosse, and an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He migrated to the Slovene coastal city of Izola in 2001, Rick is also author of Arjun and the Good Snake (2011, Amalietti & Amaliette), Wandering Stone: The Streets of Old Izola (2017, Mandrac Press), and The Manifold Destiny of Eddie Vegas (2018, River Boat Books). The author lives in Izola still, with his wife and two children. He teaches about 100 hours a year at a maritime academy in Trieste, and has co-authored numerous scientific works in the maritime field.

Tim Harwood

Tim Harwood

Believe it or not, Waterloo, Iowa, had an NBA team during the league’s first season, 1949 to 1950. Broadcaster and independent sports historian Tim Harwood uncovers the fascinating story of the Waterloo Hawks and the Midwest’s influence on professional basketball. Beginning with the professional leagues that led up to the creation of the National Basketball Association, Harwood recounts big games and dramatic buzzer-beaters, and the players who made them.

Silvia Hidalgo

Silvia Hidalgo

While author and illustrator Silvia Hidalgo (who was born in Costa Rica and moved to the U.S. in 1998) was studying for her citizenship test, she took to illustrating the different facts about government and American history to more easily absorb the information. She’s collected that information here, as a freshly designed and illustrated two-color guide to all things America. How to Be an American is a beautiful object, an innovative educational tool, and a timely reminder of the importance of understanding and upholding the core values of our democracy.

Huang Chong-Kai 黃崇凱

Huang Chong-Kai 黃崇凱

Huang Chong-Kai 黃崇凱 of Taiwan is a fiction writer and member of 字母會 [Alphabet Lab], a collective of experimental writers and theorists in Taiwan. His own novel 文藝春秋 [The Contents of the Times] won the 2018 TIBE Book Prize for Fiction, and was one of Mirror Media Review’s Ten Best Books of 2017. Huang’s participation in the IWP Fall Residency is made possible by the Taiwan Ministry of Culture.

Dan Kaufman

Dan Kaufman

Dan Kaufman is a musician and writer living in Brooklyn, New York. He has written previously about the Spanish Civil War for The Nation and the New York Times. His book, The Fall of Wisconsin traces the history of the political heritage of Wisconsin, and the overturn when the state went Republican for the first time in three decades in 2010. Kaufman, a Wisconsin native, has been covering the story for several years and traces how the state’s tradition of progressivism was undone.

Rasha Khayat

Rasha Khayat

Rasha Khayat of Germany was raised in Saudi Arabia, now lives in Germany, and runs the WestEast Diva blog, a window into the Arab world for native Germans. She writes fiction, as well as for the theater and newspapers, translates, and received the 2016 Kühne Prize for Best First Novel for Weil wir längst woanders sind [For We Are Elsewhere Now]. Khayat participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the Max Kade Institute.

William Kent Krueger

William Kent Krueger

William Kent Krueger writes a mystery series set in the north woods of Minnesota. His protagonist is Cork O’Connor, the former sheriff of Tamarack County and a man of mixed heritage—part Irish and part Ojibwe. His work has received a number of awards, including the Minnesota Book Award, the Loft-McKnight Fiction Award, the Anthony Award, the Barry Award, the Dilys Award, and the Friends of American Writers Prize. His last eight novels were all New York Times bestsellers.

Ordinary Grace, his stand-alone novel published in 2013, received the Edgar Award, given by the Mystery Writers of America in recognition for the best novel published in that year. Desolation Mountain, number seventeen in his Cork O’Connor series, will be released in August 2018.

Mary Kubica

Mary Kubica

Mary Kubica is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of four novels, including THE GOOD GIRL, PRETTY BABY, DON’T YOU CRY and EVERY LAST LIE. A former high school history teacher, Mary holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, in History and American Literature. She lives outside of Chicago with her husband and two children, where she enjoys photography, gardening and caring for the animals at a local shelter. Her first novel THE GOOD GIRL was an Indie Next pick in August of 2014, received a Strand Critics Nomination for Best First Novel and was a nominee in the Goodreads Choice Awards in Debut Goodreads Author and in Mystery & Thriller for 2014. Mary’s novels have been translated into over twenty languages and have sold over a million copies worldwide. She’s been described as “a writer of vice-like control,” (Chicago Tribune) and her novels have been praised as “hypnotic” (People) and “thrilling and illuminating” (Los Angeles Times).

Emily Liebowitz

Emily Liebowitz

NATIONAL PARK, the debut collection of poems from Emily Sieu Liebowitz, is not just something to read—it’s something to hear. Liebowitz is sending fractured radio waves like letters or songs across the great expanses that exist between coasts, people, articulation, and meaning. These poems seem to hover just above us, forcing us to meet them on a higher plane of language. In the world of this work, feeling and knowledge become synonymous. The lyric “I” of NATIONAL PARK shapes and makes meaning over, exploiting the English language’s wicked adaptability, as shaped by colonization and globalization. Time collapses into rhythm, and we find ourselves feeling our way through dismantling the American mythos’ demand for categories of definition. Emily Liebowitz grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she co-edits LVNG Magazine and lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Bejan Matur

Bejan Matur

Bejan Matur of Turkey is a poet and non-fiction writer of Kurdish origin. Her nine books of poetry and non-fiction have won several awards, and she’s been translated into 24 languages. She participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of an anonymous donor.

Mindy Mejia

Mindy Mejia

Mindy Mejia is the author of The Dragon Keeper and Everything You Want Me To Be. She writes what she likes to read: contemporary, plot-driven books that deliver both entertainment and substance. Mindy received a BA from the University of Minnesota and an MFA from Hamline University. Apart from brief stops in Iowa City and Galway, she’s lived in the Twin Cities her entire life and held a succession of jobs from an apple orchard laborer to a global credit manager. Her next book, LEAVE NO TRACE, will be released September 4, 2018.

Fatima Farheen Mirza

Fatima Farheen Mirza

Fatima Farheen Mirza was born in 1991 and raised in California. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a recipient of the Michener-Copernicus Fellowship.

Wayétu Moore

Wayétu Moore

Wayetu Moore’s debut novel, She Would Be King, was released by Graywolf Press in September, 2018. Her memoir is also forthcoming with Graywolf. Moore is the founder of One Moore Book. One Moore Book is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization that encourages reading among children of countries with low literacy rates and underrepresented cultures by publishing culturally relevant books that speak to their truths, and by creating bookstores and reading corners that serve their communities. Her first bookstore opened in Monrovia, Liberia in 2015. Her writing can be found in Guernica Magazine, The Rumpus, The Atlantic Magazine and other publications. She has been featured in The Economist Magazine, NPR, NBC, BET and ABC, among others, for her work in advocacy for diversity in children’s literature. She’s a graduate of Howard University and the University of Southern California, and is currently a Margaret Mead Fellow at Columbia University Teachers College, where she’s researching the impact of culturally relevant curriculum and learning aids in elementary classrooms of underrepresented groups. Moore is an Africana Studies lecturer at City University of New York’s John Jay College and lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Mike Mullin

Mike Mullin

Mike lives in Danville, Indiana, with his wife and her three cats. SURFACE TENSION is his fourth novel. His debut, ASHFALL, was named one of the top five young adult novels of 2011 by National Public Radio, a Best Teen Book of 2011 by Kirkus Reviews, and a 2016 YALSA Popular Paperback.

Dina Nayeri

Dina Nayeri

Dina Nayeri is the author of the acclaimed essay “The Ungrateful Refugee,” published in The Guardian as a Long Read in 2017, and a forthcoming book of narrative nonfiction on the refugee life. Winner of a National Endowment for the Arts Grant (2015), the O. Henry Prize (2015), Best American Short Stories (2018), and fellowships from the McDowell Colony, Bogliasco Foundation, Yaddo, and several other artist residencies, her work is published in over 20 countries and has been recognized by Granta New Voices, Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writersand others. A finalist for the 2017 Rome Prize, her stories and essays have been published by The New York Times, NYT Magazine, NYTBR, The Guardian, Los Angeles Times, New Yorker, Granta, Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Vice, Guernica, Electric Literature, Conjunctions, Marie Claire, and elsewhere. Her debut novel, A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea, was released in 2013 by Riverhead Books (Penguin) and translated to 14 foreign languages. She holds a BA from Princeton, an MBA and Master of Education, both from Harvard, and an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where she was a Truman Capote Fellow and Teaching Writing Fellow. Dina’s second novel, Refuge, was released in 2017 and was a New York Times editor’s choice.  She lives in London.

Derek Nnuro

Derek Nnuro

Derek Nnuro is a Ghanaian-American fiction writer based in Iowa City. He is a graduate of the fiction program at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he was a recipient of the Meta Rosenberg Memorial Fellowship and a Teaching Writing Fellowship. He was awarded the Robert J. Schulze Fellowship in 2016 and is a recipient of a fellowship from the Ragdale Foundation.  He is working on an untitled novel set in Ghana, West Africa; Houston, Texas; and Alexandria, Virginia.  He has taught novel writing at the University of Iowa.

Faisal Oddang

Faisal Oddang

Faisal Oddang of Indonesia is a fiction writer, poet, essayist, and translator, commissioned to translate “La Galigo,” the longest poem ever written, a folk tale of the Bugis people—a marginalized community in Indonesia. Oddang researches the five genders of the Bugis people and has received many awards. He participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. State Department.

Sunni Overend

Sunni Overend

Sunni Overend is a graphic design graduate, and the daughter of the late, award-winning children’s author Jenni Overend. Sunni worked briefly in creative advertising before building an online fashion store and concurrently wrote several contemporary fiction manuscripts. In 2015 she signed a two-book deal with HarperCollins Publishers and now lives with her architect husband in Melbourne where she writes full-time.

Nancy Rommelmann

Nancy Rommelmann

Nancy Rommelmann is an author and journalist whose work appears in the Wall Street Journal, the LA Weekly, The New York Times, Reason and other publications. She is the author of TO THE BRIDGE, A TRUE STORY OF MOTHERHOOD AND MURDER (July 2018), as well as several previous works of fiction and nonfiction. She lives in New York City and Portland, Oregon.

Alex Salkever

Alex Salkever

Alex Salkever is a writer, futurist and technology leader. He is the co-author with Vivek Wadhwa of and “Your Happiness Was Hacked: Why Tech Is Winning The Battle To Control Your Brain – And How To Fight Back” (to be published in June 2016). Previously, he co-authored with Wadhwa “The Driver in the Driverless Car: How Our Technology Choices Can Change the Future” was named as a Finalist in the 2017 McKinsey / Financial Times Book of the Year Competition, one of the most prestigious competitions in business books. In the book and in dozens of articles published online he explores exponentially advancing technologies such as robotics, genomics, renewable energy, quantum computing, artificial intelligence and driverless cars. He is a columnist for Fortune and previously served as the Technology Editor at BusinessWeek.com and as a Guest Researcher at the Duke University Pratt School of Engineering.

Chandramohan Sathyanathan

Chandramohan Sathyanathan

Chandramohan Sathyanathan of India uses performance and mixed-genre poetry to explore discrimination in his country, especially towards members, like himself, of the dalit caste. He participates in the IWP Fall Residency courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State.

Sjón

Sjón

Born in Reykjavik in 1962, Sjón is a celebrated Icelandic novelist. He won the Nordic Council’s Literary Prize for his novel ‘The Blue Fox’ (the Nordic countries’ equivalent of the Man Booker Prize) and the novel ‘From The Mouth Of The Whale’ was shortlisted for both the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. His novel ‘Moonstone – The Boy Who Never Was’ was awarded every Icelandic literature prize, among them the 2013 Icelandic Literary Prize. His latest published work is the definite edition of the trilogy CoDex 1962. Also a poet, librettist and lyricist, Sjón has published nine poetry collections, written four opera librettos and lyrics for various artists. In 2001 he was nominated for an Oscar for his lyrics in the film Dancer In The Dark. Sjón is the president of the Icelandic PEN Centre and former chairman of the board of Reykjavik, UNESCO city of Literature. His novels have been published in thirty five languages.

David Small

David Small

A learn-as-you-go illustrator, David Small’s books have been translated into several languages, made into animated films and musicals, and have won many of the top awards accorded to illustration, including the 1997 Caldecott Honor and The Christopher Medal for The Gardener written by his wife, Sarah Stewart, and the 2001 Caldecott Medal for So, You Want To Be President? by Judith St. George. Recognition for David’s other books include National Book Award Finalist (Stitches, 2009 and The Underneath, 2008), Christopher Award (That Book Woman, 2009 and The Gardener, 1998), ABBY Award Honor Book (The Gardener, 1997 and The Library, 1995), The New York Times Outstanding Book of the Year (The Library, 1995), and a Featured Selection for more than 10 years on Reading Rainbow (Imogene’s Antlers, 1985).

Mark D. Wilson

Mark D. Wilson

Author Mark Wilson says it best: “In our lifetimes, many of us have had or still have an individual we look up to; someone who inspires us, challenges us, helps us face adversities, or helps us form a positive outlook on life. Nile Clarke Kinnick, Jr. is that person for me. Kinnick’s way of thinking inspired me to write this book, The Way of Nile, a compilation of 366 memorable quotes from his letters, journals, and speeches.”

Wilson has been an avid Iowa Hawkeye fan since childhood. His first football game was the 1957 Rose Bowl when he was ten years old. In retirement, he is currently volunteering as an ambassador for The University of Iowa Athletics Hall of Fame and Museum, attending and supporting Hawkeye athletic events, and maintaining his Hawk Room of personal memorabilia from his adventures and experiences as a lifetime Hawkeye. The Way of Nile C. Kinnick Jr. is his first book.