James Autry

Following perilous duty on a destroyer in World War II, then becoming the first person in his family to earn a college degree, Douglas Autry returned to his native Mississippi and was elected county superintendent of education. Thus began a heroic journey to bring change to a place and to people who had proved over and over again they did not want any change that threatened their way of life. (more…)

Rana Awdish

In Shock is a riveting first-hand account from a young critical care physician, who in the passage of a moment is transfigured into a dying patient. This transposition, coincidentally timed at the end of her medical training, instantly lays bare the vast chasm between the conventional practice of medicine and the stark reality of the prostrate patient.

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Erika Billerbeck

In America’s Midwest, where “wilderness” is in short supply, working to defend what’s left of Iowa’s natural resources can be both a daunting and an entertaining task. In Wildland Sentinel, Erika Billerbeck takes readers along for the ride as she and her colleagues sift through poaching investigations, chase down sex offenders in state parks, search for fugitives in wildlife areas, haul drunk boaters to jail, perform body recoveries, and face the chaos that comes with disaster response. (more…)

Kelly Carlin

Kelly Carlin loves tackling the big questions – What are we to do with this one life? Who do we want to be as a species? How does one create a life of depth, joy and meaning in a world that can’t slow down for 2 minutes? When is it okay to finally love and accept ourselves? Where the fuck are my keys? (more…)

Charles Connerly

At the center of what was once the tallgrass prairie, Iowa has stood out for clearing the land and becoming one of the most productive agricultural states in the nation. But its success is challenged by multiple issues including but not limited to a decline in union representation of meatpacking workers; lack of demographic diversity; the advent of job-replacing mechanization; growing income inequality; negative contributions to and effects of climate change and environmental hazards. (more…)

Lisa Dillman

Lisa Dillman lives in Decatur, Georgia, and teaches at Emory University in Atlanta. She has translated some twenty-five novels, including Such Small Hands, August, October and A Luminous Republic by Andrés Barba; Signs Preceding the End of the World (winner of the 2016 Best Translated Book Award), Kingdom Cons, The Transmigration of Bodies and A Silent Fury by Yuri Herrera; and The Bitch by Pilar Quintana. She is currently working on a novel by Alejandra Costamagna. (more…)

Hope Edelman

Aren’t you over it yet? Anyone who has experienced a major loss in their past knows this question. We’ve spent years fielding versions of it, both explicit and implied, from family, colleagues, acquaintances, and friends. We recognize the subtle cues—the slight eyebrow lift, the soft, startled “Oh! That long ago?”—from those who wonder how an event so far in the past can still occupy so much precious mental and emotional real estate. (more…)

Dr. Eve L. Ewing

Dr. Eve Louise Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people. She is an assistant professor at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. Her book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism & School Closings on Chicago’s South Side explores the relationship between the closing of public schools and the structural history of race and racism in Chicago’s Bronzeville community. She often uses public platforms to discuss these social issues, particularly Twitter, where she is a well-recognized commentator with nearly 200,000 followers and tens of millions of views each month. (more…)

Fatima Farheen Mirza

As an Indian wedding gathers a family back together, parents Rafiq and Layla must reckon with the choices their children have made. There is Hadia: their headstrong, eldest daughter, whose marriage is a match of love and not tradition. Huda, the middle child, determined to follow in her sister’s footsteps. And lastly, their estranged son, Amar, who returns to the family fold for the first time in three years to take his place as brother of the bride. What secrets and betrayals have caused this close-knit family to fracture? Can Amar find his way back to the people who know and love him best?

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Thomas Frank

Rarely does a work of history contain startling implications for the present, but in The People, No Thomas Frank pulls off that explosive effect by showing us that everything we think we know about populism is wrong. Today “populism” is seen as a frightening thing, a term pundits use to describe the racist philosophy of Donald Trump and European extremists. But this is a mistake. (more…)

Anja Kampmann

One night aboard an oil drilling platform in the Atlantic, Waclaw returns to his cabin to find that his bunkmate and companion, Mátyás, has gone missing. A search of the rig confirms his fear that Mátyás has fallen into the sea. (more…)

Jill McCorkle

Lil and Frank, who each lost a parent when still a child, wed young and have aged along with their enduring marriage. Moving “home” to North Carolina after years in Boston, the retired couple faces a return to before: Lil begins sifting through letters and diaries to edit her history before passing it on to her children; Frank becomes obsessed with his childhood house, now occupied by a young single mother. At the heart of the matter is that each still yearns to understand more about the parents they lost too young. As McCorkle investigates how memory and truth are often cobbled out of bits and pieces left behind—receipts, letters, graffiti, words spoken, especially those last ones and left to interpretation—she contemplates all that we can never know about the people in our lives. (more…)

Andre Perry

Andre Perry is a writer and arts worker based in Iowa City. His debut nonfiction book, Some of Us Are Very Hungry Now, was hailed by NPR as “extraordinary” and Foreword called him “a fresh American voice that demands to be heard.” He has published in The Believer, Catapult, Granta, Guernica, The Paris Review, and other journals. He also co-founded Iowa City’s Mission Creek Festival, a celebration of music and literature, as well as the multi-disciplinary festival of creative process, Witching Hour. (more…)

Anne Posten

Anne Posten translates prose, poetry, and drama from the German. She is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship, and her translations of authors such as Peter Bichsel, Carl Seelig, Thomas Brasch, Tankred Dorst, Anna Katharina Hahn, and Paul Scheerbart have appeared with New Directions, Christine Burgin/The University of Chicago Press, Music & Literature, n+1, VICE, The Buenos Aires Review, FIELD, Stonecutter, and Hanging Loose, among other publications. She is based in Berlin. (more…)

Pilar Quintana

Colombia’s Pacific coast, where everyday life entails warding off the brutal forces of nature. In this constant struggle, nothing is taken for granted. Damaris lives with her fisherman husband in a shack on a bluff overlooking the sea. Childless and at that age “when women dry up,” as her uncle puts it, she is eager to adopt an orphaned puppy. But this act may bring more than just affection into her home. (more…)

Ron Rash

A long-revered presence in the landscape of American letters, Ron Rash has been called “one of the great American authors at work today” (Janet Maslin, The New York Times). A two-time PEN/Faulkner finalist, two-time O. Henry Short Story Prize winner, and Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award winner, Rash burst onto the national scene with his 2008 New York Times bestseller Serena, which earned him comparisons to “John Steinbeck and Cormac McCarthy” (The New Yorker). His work evokes the beauty and brutality of the land, the relentless tension between past and present, and the unquenchable human desire to be a little bit better than circumstances would seem to allow (to paraphrase Faulkner). (more…)

Marilynne Robinson

Marilynne Robinson’s new novel, Jack, is a New York Times Bestseller. Casey Cep of The New Yorker, says of the book, “Jack is the fourth novel in Robinson’s Gilead series, an intergenerational saga of race, religion, family, and forgiveness centered on a small Iowa town. But it is not accurate to call it a sequel or a prequel. Rather, this book and the others—Gilead, Home, and Lila—are more like the Gospels, telling the same story four different ways . . . At seventy-six, she is still trying to convince the rest of us that her habit of looking backward isn’t retrograde but radical, and that this country’s history, so often seen now as the source of our discontents, contains their remedy, too.” (more…)